The Champa Kingdom

Quy Nhon

Vietnam is an archeological treasure trove.  You just need to know where to look.   

As you venture further south, you will follow the path of the Vietnamese as they advanced south into the ancient Champa Kingdom, once stretching from Hue through to the Mekong.  Striking reminders of this kingdom, including Vietnam’s most remarkable temple ruins, remain scattered throughout.

While many tourists only see the My Son Sanctuary on Hoi An’s threshold, Ms Loan’s trips plunge guests into a deeper appreciation of the vanished kingdom. Trace the rise and fall of Champa’s past, with excursions to some of Vietnam’s best Champa structures off the beaten track near Quy Nhon and Mui Ne.

A recognized researcher at Hanoi’s Institute of Archaeology, where she specializes in Chinese and Vietnamese ceramics, Ms Loan literally rolled up her sleeves and began digging in the dirt beside a rice cake village in Quy Nhon in January 2015.

“We were struck by luck to have unearthed three different Champa ceramic kilns dated back to more than 1000 years, unmasking new facts leaving ceramic researchers more questions than answers and further evaluation is under way,” Ms Loan says.

Dig beneath the surface with Journeys to the East.

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Champa kingdom (1)
Champa kingdom (2)
Champa kingdom (3)
Champa kingdom (4)
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Champa kingdom (9)
Champa kingdom
Quy Nhon-excavation
Quy Nhon